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Sebaceous Hyperplasia
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Sebaceous hyperplasia is a common benign growth which occurs on the face in adults. It is due to an enlargement of the sebaceous glands (oil glands). It is common to have one or two, but a few people can have a dozen or more due their genes. This appears as a faint yellow small bump on the skin, usually between 2 to 5mm in size. If one looks closely, a small central pore can often be seen. They are most commonly located on the face, though sometimes can be found on the areola and groin. Even though these are benign, sebaceous hyperplasia can have a similar appearance to a basal cell carcinoma. If there is any doubt, a small biopsy can easily tell the difference.

Sometimes people will want these off for cosmetic reasons. There are a number of different ways this can be done. Options include photodynamic therapy, cryosurgery, laser treatment, shave excision, and full thickness excision. Sometimes they can regrow if not completely removed, and scarring is a possible complication. If someone has many lesions, oral isotretinoin can be used to shrink the lesions.

 

 

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The medical information provided in this site is for educational purposes only and is the property of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and shall not create a physician - patient relationship. If you have a specific question or concern about a skin lesion or disease, please consult a dermatologist. Any use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding or copying of this information is strictly prohibited unless expressed written permission is given by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.

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