Print Page  |  Contact Us  |  Sign In
Eczema - Infections
Share |

Flare-ups and hard to control eczema are often due to a coexisting bacterial, and sometimes fungus or virus, infection. If your eczema is weeping or oozing, if it crusted, or if it has small bumps, your doctor will probably test or treat for bacterial infection.

Systemic antibiotics are often necessary to decrease the irritation caused by Staph bacteria on the skin. Most patients with eczema have Staph bacteria on their skin, and this can cause irritation even without overt infection. In acute flares, antibiotic treatment usually lasts from 14 to 28 days. Chronic maintenance antibiotics may be used if you develop infections repeatedly. Some have found success by adding very dilute bleach to the bathwater-no more than a tablespoon for a full bathtub. Topical antibiotics like Neosporin should not be recommended and most antibacterial cleansers may worsen the condition.

Rarely, the cold sore virus (Herpes simplex) may cause extensive local or widespread infection, and is usually treated with oral antiviral medication.


Back to Index

The medical information provided in this site is for educational purposes only and is the property of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and shall not create a physician - patient relationship. If you have a specific question or concern about a skin lesion or disease, please consult a dermatologist. Any use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding or copying of this information is strictly prohibited unless expressed written permission is given by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.

Community Search
Sign In

Forgot your password?

Haven't registered yet?

Latest News