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Whitney High, MD
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Dr. Whitney High, a native of Colorado, is the director of the laboratory, and he is board-certified in dermatology and dermatopathology. He also has certification in tropical medicine and hygiene. After practicing as a chemical engineer in industry, Dr. High returned to medical school to receive his medical degree from the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in 2000. He completed his dermatology residency training at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 2004, serving as chief resident and his dermatopathology fellowship at the University of Colorado in Denver in 2005. He has also studied tropical medicine in Central and South America.

Dr. High is appointed to the Departments of Dermatology & Pathology at the University of Colorado and the Department of Chemistry at the Colorado School of Mines. He serves as the only dermatologist on faculty at the Denver STD/HIV Training Center, a clinic sponsored by the Centers of Disease Control (CDC). Dr. High also has a degree in law from the University of Denver. Dr. High has authored two textbooks, 12 chapters and more than 40 medical papers. He currently serves as one of the youngest editors of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, and he is an editor/editorial board member of other medical journals.

Dr. High’s current research interests include: pigmented lesions, medico-legal issues, infectious disease/sexually transmitted disease, pharmacological and toxicological dermatology/dermatopathology and advanced biochemical testing applied to dermatology/dermatopathology.

Dysplastic Nevi and Pigmented Lesions

This lecture highlights what is known of the relationship between benign nevi, dysplastic nevi and melanoma. 

Objectives:

  1. Provide attendees with an understanding of the conundrum of dysplastic nevi and their relationship to melanoma
  2. Help attendees appreciate the difficulties in distinguishing between benign, malignant and indeterminate melanocytic lesions
  3. Help attendees recognize situations were uncertainty regarding pigmented lesions manifests in differences in clinical care

Needs:

  1. New methods of diagnosis or treatment
  2. Development of new technology
  3. Advances in medical knowledge

References:

  • Dysplastic nevus: Fact and fiction. Rosendahl CO, Grant-Kels JM, Que SK. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2015 Sep;73(3):507-12. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2015.04.029. Epub 2015 May 30. Review.
  • Atypical moles: diagnosis and management. Perkins A, Duffy RL. Am Fam Physician. 2015 Jun 1;91(11):762-7. Review.
  • Dysplastic Nevus: Management by Canadian Dermatologists. Sapra P, Rosen C, Siddha S, Lynde CW. J Cutan Med Surg. 2015 Sep-Oct;19(5):457-63. doi:10.1177/1203475415575234. Epub 2015 Apr 1. Review.
  • Dysplastic nevi and melanoma. Goldstein AM, Tucker MA. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Apr;22(4):528-32. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-1346.

Core competencies: 2, 3, 6, 7

Tips & Techniques to Improve from the Dermatopathology Point of View

This lecture highlights missed opportunities in care at the interface of dermatology and dermatopathology.

Objectives:

  1. Help attendees recognize limitations in dermatopathology assessment
  2. Provide attendees with an understanding of situations where clinicopathologic correlation is requisite
  3. Help attendees improve biopsy technique to improve diagnosis with patient care

Needs:

  1. New advances in dermatologic treatment
  2. New methods of diagnosis or treatment
  3. Development of new technology
  4. Advances in medical knowledge

References: 

  • The most common mistakes on dermatoscopy of melanocytic lesions. Kamińska-Winciorek G, Placek W. Postepy Dermatol Alergol. 2015 Feb;32(1):33-9. doi: 10.5114/pdia.2014.44029. Epub 2015 Feb 3. Review.
  • Confusion-specimen mix-up in dermatopathology and measures to prevent and detect it. Weyers W. Dermatol Pract Concept. 2014 Jan 31;4(1):27-42. doi: 10.5826 dpc.0401a04. eCollection 2014 Jan. Review. PMID: 24520511 
  • 10 derm mistakes you don’t want to make. Fox GN. J Fam Pract. 2008 Mar;57(3):162-9. Review. 

Core competencies: 2, 3, 6, 7

 

Medicolegal Issues in Dermatology & Dermpath

This lecture covers the basics of malpractice law and malpractice situations as they apply to dermatology.

Objectives:

  1. Provide attendees with an understanding of the risk of malpractice in dermatology
  2. Help attendees recognize situations in which the risk of malpractice allegation are higher
  3. Help attendees lessen the risk of malpractice or malpractice allegation by improving care in high right situations

Needs:

  1. New methods of diagnosis or treatment
  2. Legislative, regulatory, or organizational changes effecting patient care

References: 

  • Medicolegal aspects of prescribing dermatological medications in pregnancy. Gupta R, High WA, Butler D, Murase JE. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2013 Dec;32(4):209-16.
  • Medicolegal aspects of dermatology. High WA. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2013 Dec;32(4):183-4. No abstract available.
  • Medicolegal issues with regard to melanoma and pigmented lesions in dermatopathology. Marsch A, High WA. Dermatol Clin. 2012 Oct;30(4):593-615, v-vi. doi: 10.1016/j.det.2012.06.011. Epub 2012 Aug 24. Review.
  • Malpractice in dermatopathology: principles, risk mitigation, and opportunities for improved care for the histologic diagnosis of melanoma and pigmented lesions. High WA.
  • Clin Lab Med. 2008 Jun;28(2):261-84, vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cll.2007.12.006. Review.

Core competencies: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7

Disclosures: Consultant for Myriad Labs, Castle Biosciences; Off-label: Some immunostains used in the diagnosis or melanoma are based on validation at the University of Colorado.

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