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Neal Bhatia, MD
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Dr. Neal Bhatia is a leading dermatologist in Southern California, providing patients in and around San Diego with the skilled, individualized care they need for skin and nail diseases and cosmetic concerns. With extensive skill and experience in treating a wide range of dermatologic issues, Dr. Bhatia is skilled at diagnosing common and uncommon skin diseases and conditions and in determining the ideal treatment for the best response and results for all skin types. At his practice in San Diego, he provides an array of services including state-of-the-art treatments for acne, psoriasis, rosacea, skin cancer and more. 

After earning dual bachelor of science degrees in bacteriology and genetics from the University of Wisconsin, Dr. Bhatia completed his medical degree at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine before completing residencies in internal medicine and dermatology at Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

In addition to working in private practice, Dr. Bhatia has held several academic positions, including serving as assistant clinical professor at the University of Wisconsin and the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA). Currently, he serves as associate clinical professor and interim program director in the department of dermatology at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, and he has been widely published in professional journals.

Dr. Bhatia also is a member of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) where he serves on the AAD Board of Directors, and he maintains memberships in several other professional organizations, including the American Society for Dermatological Surgery, the Dermatology Foundation, the American Dermatological Association, the Medical Dermatology Society, the Skin of Color Society and the California Society of Dermatology & Dermatologic Surgery.

In addition to providing the best possible care using the safest, most effective advanced methods, Dr. Bhatia is committed to offering each patient individualized attention and customized treatment plans so they can feel confident in the care they receive every step of the way.

  

Warts vs. Actinic Keratosis: New Weapons in the Therapeutic Civil War

Objectives:

  1. Recognize the pathogensis of warts and their similarities to actinic keratosis in terms of morphology, distribution, and responses to treatment
  2. Identify misconceptions and analyze patient approaches to warts based on knowledge gaps
  3. Compare, contrast, and evaluate the multiple modalities available for treatment of warts

Needs: 

  1. New advances in dermatologic treatment
  2. New methods of diagnosis or treatment
  3. Availability of new medication(s) or indication(s)
  4. Advances in medical knowledge

References:

  1. Bhatia, N, “An open-label exploratory study evaluating the efficacy and safety of ingenol mebutate gel 0.05% for the treatment of verruca vulgaris,” J Amer Acad Dermatol, Vol 78, Issue 3, 595 – 596
  2. Selk RS, et al. “Topical 5% 5-fluorouracil cream in the treatment of plantar warts: a prospective, randomized, and controlled clinical study.” J Drugs Dermatol. 2006 May; 5(5):418-24.
  3. Georgia Schuller-Levis MD, William Levis MD, Israel Dvoretzky. “Treatment of Recalcitrant Warts with Occlusive Warming Patches.” J Drugs Dermatol. 2014 Oct; 13(10): 1194-1196.
  4. Bristow I, Lim WC, Lee A, Holbrook D, Savelveva N, Thomson P, Webb C, Polak M, Ardern-Jones MR. “Microwave therapy for cutaneous human papilloma virus infection.” Eur J Dermatol. 2017 Oct 1; 27(5): 511-518.

Core Competencies: 2, 3, 6

 

Photodynamic Therapy 2020 Update

Objectives:

  1. Identify basic mechanisms of action of photodynamic therapy, including various light sources, optimal incubation times, and strategies to improve patient outcomes such as thermal changes to the skin
  2. Analyze and differentiate therapeutic strategies for acne, actinic keratosis, skin cancer, and other conditions where using PDT was not previously considered in practice
  3. Recognize and evaluate the adjunctive strategies to optimizing tolerability and patient safety when using PDT in dermatology

Needs: 

  1. New advances in dermatologic treatment
  2. Availability of new medication(s) or indication(s)
  3. Development of new technology

References:

  1. Honigsman, et al. . Photochemotherapy and photodynamic therapy Dermatology in General Medicine. New York, NY: McGraw Hill Co; 1999:2880-2900.
  2. Mamalis A, Koo E, Sckisel GD, Siegel DM, Jagdeo J, “Temperature-dependent impact of thermal aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapy on apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation in human dermal fibroblasts,” Br J Dermatol 2016 Sep;175(3):512-9.

Core Competencies: 2, 3, 6

 

How to Meet the Challenges of Hyperhidrosis

Objectives:

  1. Recognize the basic mechanisms of physiological and pathological sweating including hyperhidrosis
  2. Analyze the quality of life and psychosocial impact of hyperhidrosis
  3. Identify the anticholinergic and other adverse events associated with therapies for hyperhidrosis

Needs: 

  1. New advances in dermatologic treatment
  2. New methods of diagnosis and treatment
  3. Availability of new medication(s) or indication(s)

References:

  1. Doolittle et al, Arch Dermatol Res, 2016; 308(10); 743-9
  2. Glaser et al, “Understanding Patient Experience with Hyperhidrosis…” J Drugs Dermatol, 2018; (17(4);392-396

Core Competencies: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

 

How Do Biologics Fit in an Integrative Treatment Plan?

Objectives:

  1. Analyze and define the various mechanisms of actions of biologic therapies used in dermatology
  2. Recognize the risks of under treatment of psoriasis patients
  3. Interpret and employ measures to maximize safety and efficacy of biologics

Needs: 

  1. New methods of diagnosis and treatment
  2. Availability of new medication(s) or indication(s)
  3. Advances in medical knowledge

References:

  1. Garshick, M et al, “Sex differences in the prevalence of vascular disease and risk factors in young hospitalized patients with psoriasis Intl J Women Derm, Article in Press available online
  2. Curtis JR, Lee EB, Kaplan IV, et al.,”Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor: analysis of malignancies across the rheumatoid arthritis clinical development programme. “ Ann Rheum Dis. 2016;75(5):831-841.

Core Competencies: 2, 3, 6

2902 North Baltimore Street | P.O. Box 7525 | Kirksville, Missouri 63501

660-665-2184 | 1-800-449-2623 | 660-627-2623